Danbury Treatment Plant Connection

Danbury

The Danbury takes the Brookfield wastewater discharge under what is called an Interlocal agreement. That agreement requires Brookfield sewer system users to pay per gallon for operations, plus pay an apportioned amount for plant improvements. In the early part of this decade, Brookfield has used about 3 percent of the total flows handled by the plant. Consequently, Brookfield users pay 3% of the improvements to the Danbury Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW).

By the Interlocal agreement, Brookfield is limited to discharge an average of 500,000 gallons per day (GPD), that is 500 MGPD. Slightly more than half of the purchased plant capacity was used since 2006. However, this capacity limit is slated to decrease in 2022 to 380,000 GPD with a significant upgrade of the Danbury Plant upgrade that is slated to have reduced Phosphorus discharge limits.

See the chart of historical discharges below. The annual outflow seems to ebb and flow with economic activity in Brookfield.

Year Average Daily Flow, M Gallons Per Day
2018  303.1
2017  286.6
2016  284.7
2015  279.0
2014  276.1
2013  277.4
2012  278.0
2011  289.6
2010  288.0
2009  229.5
2008  258.9
2007  264.8
2006  240.4
2005  232.4
2004  237.9
2003  241.7
2002  239.7
2001  238.6
2000  240.6
1999  226.9
1998  221.8
1997  230.3
1996  230.6
1995  220.2
1994  206.2
1993  184.0
1992  155.6
1991  150.1
1990  153.3
1989  125.0
1988  127.3
1987  127.3
1986  129.6
1985  140.7
1984  95.7
1983  99.5
1982  90.0
1981  73.0

Q & A:

Q: What is the system capacity?

A: The instantanous flow rate of the pumps to Danbury is 2000M Gallons per day. The practical capacity is roughly 50% of that or 1000M, that is, a million gallons per day.

Q: Can Brookfield send that quantity to Danbury for treatment?

A: No. The InterLocal agreement with Danbury limits flow to 500 thousand gallons per day (MGPD) on the average.

Q: With projects currently on the drawing board what is the danger of running out of capacity?

No. There is sufficient capacity through 2022 with the current Danbury agreement and the current capability of the equipment. This Danbury agreement was re-negotiated. A signed agreement was executed December 2014. However, this is slated to be reduced in 2022, with a planned upgrade that will include new Phosphorus removal capability. 

Note: Danbury reports the regional plant is designed for a capacity of 15.5 million gallons per day (MMGPD).  In 2016, the plant currently operated at 9 MMGPD.  Danbury has estimated flows at 11.5 MMGPD 30 years out.  A Danbury Plant Upgrade to remove phosphorus is slated reduce the plant capacity to this 11.5 MMGPD.

Projects in play include: (Updated April 2018)

Development: Units New MGPD Status
Industrial Units Federal Road 25 6 (Project Stalled)
Oak Meadow Condos 120 7 (About 1/2 completed)
Town Center Area 75 6 (Under Construction)
Green Acres 100 8 (Project Stalled)
Northern Laurel Hill Road 75 6 (Under discussion)
Four Corners Area 150? 12 Condos/Apts/Retail (?)
Recent Projects Completed: (Now included in 2018+ flows)
Barnbeck Condos 150 (Completed in 2017)
Southern Laurel Hill Road 88 (Completed late 2015)
Newbury Village 125 (Completed 2015)
Old New Milford Road 20 (Completed 2013)
Riverview Condos 60 (Completed 2015)
Brooks Quarry 16 0 Upgraded 2017 (CHFA grant)
Sandy Lane 80 0 Re-routed system to gravity
Rollingwood 250 0 Re-routing system to gravity
Possible Future:
Dean Road 80 6 Under Discussion
Lake Areas 450 35 Nothing is planned
Whisconier Areas 250 20 Nothing is planned
“Cornfield” property N/A < 12 for whatever may be built
Others-Long Range N/A < 20 for whatever may be built
Total < 140

Note: These planned and future totals should not exceed the capability of the equipment. A review of the infrastructure will be conducted after the expanded monitoring system is installed.

Separately, a Twenty-Year Plan study was completed to determine if additional capacity from Danbury will need to be increased from the current 500,000 gallon per day limit. This was an exhaustive study looking at all areas of Brookfield where sewers might be installed. It is not anticipated that addiitional treatment capacity will be needed for the next 10 years or so and maybe never.