Candlewood Sewer Project - Impact on Water Supply

​Since the April 2020 Newsletter was published some questions have been asked. We will attempt to keep the new Real Questions page up to date. Call or contact us with your questions.

Candlewood Lake Study DocumentDescription
Follow up report on study area:
Impact of Sewers on Well Water Supply
A 43-page report discussing the effect of removing septic discharge on water recharge from deep wells on the Candlewood Peninsula.
March 2021
USGS Report CoverSimulation of Ground-Water Flow to Assess Geohydrologic Factors and their Effect on Source-Water Areas for Bedrock Wells in ConnecticutThis is a key reference.
A 86-page report by USGS in cooperation with the CT Department of Health. Published 2004
An extensive scientific investigation of ground water hydrology in CT.
See report pages 14-17

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Overview:
A study was conducted to investigate the issue of well water recharge on the Candlewood Peninsula if septic discharges were captured and no longer draining into the ground. This was the subject of further study by Lombardo Associates.

The short answer is that deep rain water infiltration is 14% of total rain, as found by the USGS investigation. That is about twice the water draw from wells. In addition, the well logs show the radius of influence includes the lake with a vast amount of water available to replenish the wells.

Further, calculations from the amount of contamination indicate that the about 25% of the well water is derived from septic flow. That means most of the well recharge, approximately 75%, is due to infiltration from rain or the lake. Take a look at the study report. It is a rather sophisticated overview of the question that has undergone peer review.

The collection of studies show that removing septic recharge to wells should significantly improve water supply quality, which has periodically exceeded and routinely borders on violating nitrate drinking water standard.

Let us know if you have questions or comments.

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